Sunday, January 17, 2010

Roughly translated from the original French



PORT-AU-PRINCE - An employee of the prestigious Hotel Montana has survived its collapse for almost five days trapped under a pile of stones and metal rods bent. Rescuers have managed to remove the rubble overnight.
The lady in her mid-fifties, a Haitian, was miraculously unhurt. She was dehydrated but is doing well, very well even in the circumstances. "We had a little party," said a rescuer Luis Miguel Gonzalez of the Colombian Red Cross, who was delighted with the result after more than fifteen hours of intensive hard work.

"It was in perfect condition. She had no injuries. She was aware she was talking, "he said. Nearly 200 people, including six Quebecers are still in the rubble of this luxurious four star hotel, located in the mountains of Petionville. All that remains of the five floors, is part of the common room and restaurant. Everything else is so imposing it is a heap of stones.

Dozens of rescuers Brazilian, Colombian and Spanish participated in the effort, with three search dogs that have found the lady. "The men who work there, they have faith. There have been ups and downs but it is something that concerns me today ... They said it's too dangerous. It took more than twenty-five hours to leave a lady that was found. So there is life on behalf of all those who left too soon, I ask all live to love others ... That's what matters, "Joëlle philosopher Benedict, who is still looking for his daughter, Sarah Lauture, who studied at McGill University in Montreal.

"She was beaming and happy (she worked at the Hotel Montana). The day before the crash, I told him: you are beautiful. If it is not for me, I will have the satisfaction of seeing it grow and have lived it fully with his twenty-eight. Live! Bless the children! This is not about church. It is the heart, humanity and the world needs it, "she said, brimming with confidence. "There are only miracles here. Yes, I believe she is alive! "Until now, nine people were rescued from the ruins.

Not well equipped

One of the most striking findings is the lack of heavy machinery to lift the rubble, which greatly hinders the possibility of finding survivors. "It's really frustrating, it's so long ... We want to do something but what can we do? They have no machinery to work. They do what they can with what little they have. They made a hole with a crowbar for a small Chilean can enter and go look under the ruins, has launched Zip Hinton, whose niece, Courtney Hays, is missing.